wordpress 3.2 updateWe are seeing a lot of big updates coming at us one after another, Google’s Panda Update 2.2 or Youtube’s Cosmic Panda update. For those of you who have you own website or blog, you are probably at least vaguely familiar with the WordPress platform. There are others of you that actually use WordPress and know that it seems like they update the platform about once a month. Well a few days ago we didn’t get one of those small x.x.2 updates but got a semi-major x.2 update (if that makes sense, think of iTunes’ plethora of updates). We have gone from WordPress 3.1.3 to WordPress 3.2.

What happened in the WordPress 3.2 update

There are a few things on the high-level technical end that they changed, such as server and plugin support minimum requirements, but I will stick to the things that the majority of people will notice.

New Default theme

If you are anything like me, at one point you assumed that the default theme was something you must change immediatelyNew WordPress 3.2 theme because it was a too simple. Well, I have recently discovered that I was highly mistaken; the default WordPress theme is perhaps one of (if not the) best places to begin show off your web design skills. In the WordPress 3.2 update we get a new default theme – Twenty Eleven – it allows for a huge amount of customization and host of great integrated features in this newest iteration (older versions of Twenty Ten and Duster).

Internet Explorer 6 unsupported

Internet Explorer 6 not supportedThis one is fair self-explanatory, WordPress has made it so that Internet Explorer 6 is no longer a supported browser as its user interface struggles to keep up with the newest set of features. This isn’t a really big issue, it just means that it is time to upgrade to a new browser (Chrome, Firefox, IE9, Opera, etc…)

Uncluttered writing space

Some people like to have a clean clutter-free environment to write in. One of the cool newWordpress 3.2 distraction free writing mode features is that you can now turn off all of the side features on post and page creation/editing pages. This makes it so that you won’t have anything on the page to distract your eye. Now, next time you get going on a great thought you won’t have anything to distract up your creative juice.

Jamie Bates