Do you remember that math teacher you had in middle school who gave the same response to every question without ever giving a satisfactory answer. She figured that using a louder voice or a more exasperated tone was the key to communicating truth and knowledge. But you still had no idea what she was saying. She wasn’t answering your questions.

Frequently Asked QuestionsWell, consider that math teacher’s methods anytime your website’s Frequently Asked Questions page comes to mind.

If people are asking the same questions of your site over and over again, there may be something wrong with your site. What is the point of your site if it’s not communicating your message effectively?

The more people you confuse with your site’s content (or lack thereof) the fewer people are going to use you as a resource, to stick around or come back again.

Consumers are even less focused and understanding when they are searching the web than when they come into your store or speak with you on the phone. They aren’t going to forgive your site’s shortcomings; they will see them as a reflection of your service – your respect and responsibility, your level of professionalism.

Having an FAQ is not a bad thing. But it should not be used as a crutch. Make sure that the vital and defining information on your site is very accessible and clear.

The easier your site is to use– to communicate your message effectively– the more likely you are to retain the customers that you bring in online.

Search engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing crawl the web looking for the most people-friendly sites. They recognize that people want easy, accessible, and fast. So, each of the major search engines uses these variables in determining your position in the search engine rankings.

Your FAQ page is an accurate indicator of your site’s on-site health. If a person must view this page to find out important information (like what you do/sell) then you can see that there is a problem. Fixing the problem could lead to a better conversion of viewers and a stronger ROI for your website.

Jamie Bates