What do the CIA, Sony, the U.S. Senate, Nintendo, and the Syrian Ministry of Defense all have in common? Well, their websites have all been hacked in the past few months.

The group responsible for the majority of the attacks, Lulz Security, opposes the computer security industry. They disrupted many corporations as well as local and state governments in the month of June “just because they could.” Surprisingly enough, however, LulzSec decided to disband at the end of June. However, this of course does not signify the end of hackers, and maybe not even the end of LulzSec itself.

Hackers Strike AgainOn the other hand, Anonymous, yet another hacker group with a strong following, was responsible for taking down the Syrian Ministry of Defense website this week. This group tends to target organizations and agencies whose policies they oppose. For example, the reason for the Syrian website hack was the opposition to Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad and his rule. After all, the hack included an actual message calling for the current president’s removal.

But this is not all—Anonymous has announced its next target: Facebook. According to a statement made by Anonymous, November 5 is the day that this social media marketing company will be taken down. The reason for this planned attack is supposedly Hackers Strike AgainAnonymous’ opposition to Facebook’s lack of privacy, claiming that Facebook is selling information given by users to maintain profitability.

And yet, only a day later, others are saying that this “#OpFacebook” is a hoax. They claim that the Lulz Security hacks of June stirred up some cyberhackers that wanted to be part of a movement, but that this will die down as well.

Is it worth the risk to let a threat like this slide? Is it fair for someone to have control of the Internet?Should we really be worried that the “medium of communication [we] all so dearly adore” may cease to exist? As of now, it seems that we may just have to wait until November 5 to find out.

Jamie Bates